Jun 11, 2012. Your email address will not be published. According to Castilian Spanish, it is pronounced "oh-ho-day-Dee-ohs" (the "j" is silent or sometimes has a light "h" sound). I think mal de ojo, seen in Hispanic culture, should be considered a CBS because the illness has cultural significance and treatment throughout the community. Making one is inviting the Eye of God to watch over them. Learn how your comment data is processed. This exploration is for all ages, as the colored smilies show. Ojos de Dios, which is Spanish for “Eyes of God,” are made from yarn and sticks by native peoples of Mexico and South America. Often they are made for little children as gifts. We love sharing these resources with you and thank you for your support! They were woven on to crisscrossing sticks, joining in the center. Some Christians interpret the symbol to be a prayer for “May God be with you and protect you.” Required fields are marked *. Our assignment was to make a … A God’s Eye craft is a classic childhood yarn craft , always popular at Sunday school, summer camp, Girl Guides and after-school craft clubs. This was the standard for the ojo de dios assignment. The Ojo de Dios or God's eye is a ritual tool, magical object, and cultural symbol evoking the weaving motif and its spiritual associations for the Indians of western Mexico. Check your email inbox for your free unit download instructions. I could have improved by making the decoration more presentable because at first it came out weird but then i did more and it turned ut beter than it was. The standard of the ojo de dios assignment is Culture 2.1. 2.How does the assignment relate to the standard? Once you’ve done all your colors tie it off at the end. The "Ojo de Dios" or God's Eye is an ancient symbol made by the Huichol Indians of Mexico and the Aymara Indians of Bolivia. The Ojo has roots in the ancient Huichol Indians of Mexico. We thank you! Keep the unit forever, no questions asked. Few outsiders are welcome in Huichol villages located in the high sierra. In Mexico, The central eye was made when a child was born. This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. An activity can be the making of an traditional object called Ojo de Dios Project. Start family-style homeschooling now with a free Layers of Learning unit when you subscribe. It is a physical representation of praying for health, fortune, and a long life. The email should arrive within 15 minutes. This assignment relates to the standard because by making an Ojo de Dios (eye of god) I was able to tell the differences between my culture and customs to peoples of different origin. Oct 20, 2017 - The weaving of an ojo de dios is considered a form of prayer and is often given as a gift for protection or as a house blessing. Jul 18, 2016 - Give your second-grader insight into the Huichol culture of Mexico with this arts and craft activity by creating an ojo de Dios (eye of God), or yarn weaving. The sides of the object are made of wood, typically thin and flexible reeds. You can make an Ojo de Dios with your whole family together! 2. This video will show you how to create a beautiful traditional Mexican craft: Ojo de Dios.Want a fun activity box? Come meet us! Once your center is covered, begin going around the center, over and around the sticks, one corner after another. We like to use one multi-colored skein of yarn. Third Eye: In Hinduism, the Anja chakra is said to be the “third eye,” connected to intuition. Thank You! They create energetic and lively art and music. Many indigenous populations in Central and South America use textiles to represent their culture and day-to-day lifestyle. The four points represent the elements: Earth, Air, Fire, Water. Hi. Culture 2.1 and you have to understand cultural differences in order to identify cultural importance. They accompany wishes of health, long life, and protection. Themes of nature and the natural world are common in Native American arts. In light pink and white, small God’s eye/Ojo de Dios ornament God's Eye (Ojo de Dios) Chances are you’ve made one yourself as a youngster. The envious person who gives the compliment, often unwittingly, casts the evil eye on the baby, resulting in the baby’s illness or death. Traditional bindhis are red and are painted on the forehead in a perfect circle. We learned how to pronounce the name and where it came from. Choose colors that you love for their vibrancy and life! In the exact middle of the ojo de Dios is a rectangular piece covered in a contrasting color. Pingback: At The Mountain's Base: A Beautifully Woven Story of Family, Love, and Bravery - Homeschool By The Beach, Your email address will not be published. In many of the Pueblos of New Mexico (U.S.) Ojos de Dios have traditionally been created for celebration or blessing, presented as a gift or designed to bless a home. Background:Ojo de Dios is Spanish for "eye of God." This art is a way to celebrate festivals. You will find them in the sidebars of each Layers of Learning unit. The God’s Eye is a very spiritual tool. Find more similar words at wordhippo.com! Jay Mohler : “Ojos de Dios” is Spanish for *Eye of God”, and can be thought of as a prayer that can be hung on your wall, reminding us both … Create a poem about the four elements – earth, wind, water, and fire. Additional Layers are extra activities you can do or tangents you can take off on. Ojo de dios is one of the artistic features of a culture. The Huichol Indians who lived in the mountains made God’s eyes (or Ojos de Dios) to watch over them. First samples of the God’s eye/Ojo de Dios pattern. In some Eastern religions, chakras (literally “wheels”) are centers in the body through which energy can be exchanged. The craft of yarn weaving (or yarn painting) attracts significant attention from people of other cultures, however, so some Huichol Indians do produce yarn art for tourists and collectors that resemble traditional Sikuli. (In the United States, many mall stores that specialize in fashion accessories sell bindis in a variety of designs and colors.). From this assignment, I have learned and applied the different standards onto it. 20 Years visiting the HuicholA personal reflectio… As Amazon affiliates, the recommended books and products below kick back a tiny percentage of your purchase to us. It can be used for protection from enemies, protection from evil or it could be used symbolically as God’s guidance, His presence, and His watching over you. Culture 2.1 understanding cultural differences in order to identify cultural importance. For the Huichol peoples of northwestern Mexico, the God's Eye is symbolic of the power of seeing and understanding that which is unknown and unknowable, The Mystery.The four points represent the elemental processes earth, fire, air, and … The weaving of an Ojo de Dios is an ancient contemplative and spiritual practice. Show off your project and read your narration out loud. Sep 30, 2011 - Explore Ann Rinkenberger's board "Ojo de Dios", followed by 535 people on Pinterest. We're tremendously glad you've joined the Layers of Learning family. The Huichol people focused their worship on nature and the earth rather than a specific divine being. Learn more about Layers of Learning. When you’re ready for a new color, just tie the new color to the end of the first color and continue weaving and wrapping. By cultural, I mean the different traditions and the importance that can be pulled out from the different activities they do. 1. Earth is a mound of brown that seems lifeless, but is the medium for life to grow from. Also i can learn the culture and history of the Ojo De Dios. The powers attributed to the eyes in world religions ranges from the ability to ordinary people to use their eyes to curse others to the development of a “third eye” that provides those with significant spiritual discipline the ability to intuit that which cannot always be physically seen. As Amazon Associates, we do earn from qualifying purchases when you buy something through the links we recommend. The Huichol of Jalisco and Nayaritby Robert Otey 2. You need craft sticks, scissors, and several colors of yarn. Ojo de Dios  (oh-ho-day-DEE-ohs) is Spanish for “Eye of God.”  When the early Spaniards came to Mexico they encountered the Huichol (wet-chol) people who lived in the Sierra Madre mountains of Mexico. 3. In this activity, give your child some insight into another culture by helping her create an ojo de Dios (eye of God), a representation of the yarn weaving done by the Huichol population of northwest Mexico. Eyes have significance in many world religions as well as folk magic traditions. Many have migrated to cities such as Tepic and Guadalajara; others struggle with poverty, land-invasion and illness caused by pesticides in tobacco plantations where many find work as day laborers. The Ojo de Dios art exploration accompanies Unit 3-12 about Native American Art. Culture 2.1 is to understand cultural differences to identify cultural importance. In modern times, bindis may be made from self-adhesive pieces of fabric and worn more as a fashion statement than as a religious observance. 2. Native American art is known and recognized for its vibrant bright colors and patterns. In Bolivia, "God's Eyes" were made to be placed on an altar so that the gods could watch over the … Here are some suggestions, but if you can’t find these, look for books at your library about Native Americans and Native American arts, and crafts. Your goal is to cover the center square as completely as possible. (Interestingly enough, many understandings of the evil eye make it clear that the person who casts the evil eye isn’t always malicious. How does the assignment relate to the standard? The ojo de Dios features four, eight or 12 sides, which are symmetrical. The powers attributed to the eyes in world religions ranges from the ability to ordinary people to use their eyes to curse others to the development of a “third eye” that provides those with significant spiritual discipline the ability to intuit that which cannot always be physically …